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Lehigh University Libraries - Library Guides

Behavioral Neuroanatomy: Citing and plagiarism

Professor Swann, Spring 2020

RefWorks

RefWorks is a web-based program that helps you gather, organize, store, and generate citations and bibliographies.

Currently, there are two active versions of RefWorks: Legacy RefWorks and New RefWorks. See the "RefWorks - Versions" page below for login links, LibraryGuides, and support options for both versions of RefWorks.

Journal Citation Style -- NLM

Proper citing can help you avoid plagiarism. Visit the Avoiding Plagiarism guide!

An example of a citation style is the National Library of Medicine style.

The citation example below is for this article. Look at this article, then compare to the example below. When you cite journal articles sources for your work in the class, render them in the same style as you see below. 

*Use this site to find how to abbreviate the journal.

Make sure to include citations in your presentation for your citations, either at the bottom of the slide(s) or batched at the end of the Powerpoint. SCROLL DOWN TO SEE NOTES ABOUT HOW TO CITE RESOURCES OTHER THAN JOURNAL ARTICLES. ALSO, SCROLL DOWN TO SEE HOW FROM WITHIN YOUR TEXT YOU CAN POINT TO THE REFERENCE LIST AT THE END OF YOUR PAPER.

 Image above is from Citing Medicine: The NLM Style Guide for Authors, Editors, and Publishers [Internet]. 2nd edition.

See  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7282/pdf/Bookshelf_NBK7282.pdf

See Citing Medicine2nd edition to see how to reference journals, websites, books, newspapers and other resources. Note: from this guide: "Journals are a particular type of periodical. These same rules and examples can be used for magazines and other types of periodicals."  

 


According to this guide, NLM recognizes three types of "in-text" citations. In other words, this is how *from within the text of your document* you create pointers down to the list of references at the end of the document.  Look over the examples here.

https://libguides.usc.edu/c.php?g=293796&p=1956190